Syllabus

CMP 2850: Great Works of Literature II

REQUIRED TEXTS

The readings will be posted online – you do not need to purchase a book.
All excerpts are sourced from :
The Norton Anthology of World Literature, 4th edition, Vols. D, E, F 
(bundle at campus bookstore and elsewhere, if you wish to purchase the paper copy).
See Blackboard Course Documents for citing the anthology.
– Any other materials will be provided. 
-For style, editing, & source citations (for all writing assignments), bookmark https://owl.english.purdue.edu. 

LEARNING GOALS

  • Increased ability to interpret meaning in literary texts by paying close attention to an author’s choices of detail, vocabulary, and style
  • Ability to discuss the relationship between different genres of literary texts and the multicultural environments in which they are created
  • Increased confidence in offering a critical evaluation and appreciation of a literary work’s strengths and limitations
  • Increased confidence in the oral presentation of ideas
  • Increased ability to write critical essays employing a strong thesis statement, appropriate textual citations, and contextual and intertextual evidence for their ideas

ASSESSMENT
Informed participation – 50%
4 in-class response essays – 35%
Introduce-a-reading – 15%

Informed participation:
(1) In-class participation : coming to class having closely read the material, ready to discuss and ask questions; actively participating in/contributing to synchronous or asynchronous discussions.
(2) Homework :
Before synchronous classes : choose a passage from the assigned reading(s) that you found particularly interesting, challenging, beautiful, frustrating, etc. Quote and cite the passage – share your interpretation of the text and end with a question for me and your classmates. Post your work by 10 pm the night before we meet. I will use your questions to structure our discussion. 
For asynchronous class dates : same activity as above (reaction to a passage + a question), but you must also respond to at least 5 of your classmates’ comments

Introduce-a-reading: A 15-minute Introduction to a reading (these will be assigned and the schedule posted to BB). Your introduction should include a description of plot, tone, and, where applicable, theme(s) of the work. Identify two key passages that you found significant to the work, and tell us why these struck you as important. Tell us also how this work reflects the time period of which it is apart (consult Norton for historical and literary context and cite it accordingly). This must be your own original work. Our Norton text(s) is/are the only secondary source that may be consulted and should be cited using MLA format. 

In-class response essays. During several class sessions listed on the schedule, you will choose an essay question from a short list of options (based on specific topics or themes from the readings) and take an hour to respond. 

ATTENDANCE
You may miss class up to 3 times, no questions asked. Starting at your fourth unexcused absence, and for each absence beyond it, your final course grade will be lowered by a half letter grade (A- becomes B+, etc). If you miss six or more class sessions, you are subject to earning an F in the course.  Please notify me via e-mail if you are unable to attend class.

Attending class on Zoom

  • Have the texts and any other necessary materials in front of you.
  • Come to class on time – lateness is disruptive even on Zoom. I will take attendance at the start of class. 
  • Do not subject us to the pain of a blank screen; please turn your camera on or provide a profile photo. 
  • Do not be in transit, driving a vehicle, at your job, or otherwise distracted while attending the Zoom meeting. If you can’t be fully present for the time allotted, I would not recommend registering for this class. 
  • While of course we all have technical issues sometimes, in general you should make sure that you have (1) a working device with which to attend Zoom meetings and allows for full functionality (sometimes phones don’t allow you to see PowerPoints, etc.), (2) a working microphone, (3) reliable wi-fi. Baruch has free tech and hotspots that you can request, so everyone should have access to the tech they need. 

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